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Ayanda Borotho on Mondeor High murder: These kids don’t raise themselves

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Ayanda Borotho on Mondeor High murder: These kids don’t raise themselves

Ayanda Borotho on Mondeor High murder: These kids don't raise themselves
Ayanda Borotho on Mondeor High murder: These kids don’t raise themselves

Ayanda Borotho has asked parents what they are doing to ensure they are raising children that understand right from wrong.
Image: Instagram/Ayanda Borotho
Actress Ayanda Borotho, like many South Africans, have expressed outrage over the fatal stabbing of 19-year-old Mondeor High School pupil Kulani Mathebula.

Three suspects have been arrested in connection to the murder. They are aged between 13 and 15 years. The 13-year-old was nabbed on Wednesday afternoon and the two 15 year olds were arrested on Thursday morning in Soweto and Naturena.

Ayanda, who is known for her strong opinions on topical social matters, took to Instagram to explain that while she was heartbroken by the senseless loss of young lives, she felt parents’ needed a wake up call.

“I cannot emphasise enough the importance of parenting. I’m not talking about having children. We can all be mothers and fathers but the question is can we parent, are we in a position to parent, are we ready to parent? In the absence of parenting, this is what society becomes.

“Children are merely an extension of ourselves. Children don’t do as they are told they do as they see. We can tell them all the ‘right’ things to do but in the absence of our demonstration, we are screwed. We can’t blame these kids. They are merely manifesting the chaos that is us. They are manifesting our absence.”

The actress made it clear she was not speaking as an expert but as a concerned parent herself.

Ayanda believes that even though parenting is difficult, parents should do better.

“And I know it’s tough. The rat race has us by the balls. We are chasing life and money so we can do for them what we didn’t have ourselves but it’s not about provision. We have to absolutely understand that what we leave deposited in our children is far more important than what we leave for them.”